The following 3 Personal Effectiveness Workshops will as always be held at The Vale Resort on:

** Wednesday 14th May
** Wednesday 11th June
** Wednesday 9th July

Call 07979805502 or email mattcollins@impactpeoplecoaching.com to book today.

Advertisements

Help Your People Develop on the Job #Managementtips #PersonalEffectiveness

Posted by Matt Collins on April 1, 2014

As much as 90% of learning and development takes place on the job – which makes sense since continuous learning is a key strategy for a sustainable career. In fact, employees’ direct managers are often their most important developers. Help your team members flourish with these tips:

• Instead of a yearly conversation about career goals during performance reviews, talk frequently. Regular discussions about your employees’ objectives and interests help them to refine goals and spot opportunities for development.

• When planning a group project, ask team members to identify both how they can contribute and what they would like to learn. This avoids their volunteering to perform only tasks that they already know they can do.

• Ask employees to report back periodically to you and fellow team members on what they have been learning and how they are using their new skills and knowledge.

 

Avoid These Confidence-Busting Traps

 

By Matt Collins
March 21, 2014

Confidence is an expectation of a positive outcome. It is not a personality trait; it is an assessment of a situation that sparks motivation. It’s not confidence itself that produces success; it’s the investment and the effort. To muster the confidence to meet your goals, avoid these common traps:

• Goals that are too big or too distant. Leaders often like to say they want to tackle BHAGs — “big hairy audacious goals.” But having only enormous goals can actually undermine confidence. Confidence comes from small wins that occur repeatedly, with each small step moving you closer to the big goal.

• Blaming someone else. Confidence rests on taking responsibility for one’s own behavior. Even in difficult circumstances, we have choices about how to respond to adversity. When the blame game is carried out within companies, everyone loses confidence, including external stakeholders. Confidence is the art of moving on.

Help Your People Develop on the Job #Managementtips #PersonalEffectiveness

By Matt Collins

March 21, 2014

As much as 90% of learning and development takes place on the job – which makes sense since continuous learning is a key strategy for a sustainable career. In fact, employees’ direct managers are often their most important developers. Help your team members flourish with these tips:

• Instead of a yearly conversation about career goals during performance reviews, talk frequently. Regular discussions about your employees’ objectives and interests help them to refine goals and spot opportunities for development.

• When planning a group project, ask team members to identify both how they can contribute and what they would like to learn. This avoids their volunteering to perform only tasks that they already know they can do.

• Ask employees to report back periodically to you and fellow team members on what they have been learning and how they are using their new skills and knowledge.

Get Out of Your Comfort Zone #Managementtips #Leadership

Get Out of Your Comfort Zone

By Matt Collins
March 6, 2014

Moving beyond our comfort zones is how we can best learn and grow. To develop the courage to take a leap, and the skill and ability to actually pull it off:

Understand what’s in it for you to motivate yourself. Brainstorm how working on this tough behavior — networking, perhaps, or public speaking — can advance your career or help you reach other goals.

• Then, customize a plan to take control of a situation instead of being overwhelmed by it. If, for example, you’re an introvert who dreads networking events, instead of feeling pressured to meet everyone, focus on a few people and actually try to get to know them, or aim to make initial contacts with the goal of following up in a more comfortable setting.

7 Things Highly Productive People Do #PersonalEffectiveness #Attitude

You have more important things to focus on than, um, focusing. Get back on track with these tips.

You probably don’t want to admit it but you love distractions. In fact, just like monkeys, you get a shot of dopamine every time something pulls you in another direction. Why do you think you check your email so much?

Want to be more productive and get your focus back? There are no secret tricks here… do one thing at a time. Stop multitasking—it’s just another form of distraction.

Easier said than done, I know.

Recently I sat down with Tony Wong, a project management blackbelt whose client list includes Toyota, Honda, and Disney, to name a few. He’s an expert in keeping people on task, so I thought he’d be a good person to ask.

Here are his tips for staying productive:

  1. Work backwards from goals to milestones to tasks. Writing “launch company website” at the top of your to-do list is a sure way to make sure you never get it done. Break down the work into smaller and smaller chunks until you have specific tasks that can be accomplished in a few hours or less: Sketch a wireframe, outline an introduction for the homepage video, etc. That’s how you set goals and actually succeed in crossing them off your list.
  2. Stop multi-tasking. No, seriously—stop. Switching from task to task quickly does not work. In fact, changing tasks more than 10 times in a day makes you dumber than being stoned. When you’re stoned, your IQ drops by five points. When you multitask, it drops by an average of 10 points, 15 for men, five for women (yes, men are three times as bad at multitasking than women). 
  3. Be militant about eliminating distractions. Lock your door, put a sign up, turn off your phone, texts, email, and instant messaging. In fact, if you know you may sneak a peek at your email, set it to offline mode, or even turn off your Internet connection. Go to a quiet area and focus on completing one task.
  4. Schedule your email. Pick two or three times during the day when you’re going to use your email. Checking your email constantly throughout the day creates a ton of noise and kills your productivity.
  5. Use the phone. Email isn’t meant for conversations. Don’t reply more than twice to an email. Pick up the phone instead. 
  6. Work on your own agenda. Don’t let something else set your day. Most people go right to their emails and start freaking out. You will end up at inbox-zero, but accomplish nothing. After you wake up, drink water so you rehydrate, eat a good breakfast to replenish your glucose, then set prioritized goals for the rest of your day. 
  7. Work in 60 to 90 minute intervals. Your brain uses up more glucose than any other bodily activity. Typically you will have spent most of it after 60-90 minutes. (That’s why you feel so burned out after super long meetings.) So take a break: Get up, go for a walk, have a snack, do something completely different to recharge. And yes, that means you need an extra hour for breaks, not including lunch, so if you’re required to get eight hours of work done each day, plan to be there for 9.5-10 hours.

IMPACT PEOPLE COACHING PROMOTIONAL VIDEO

Take a look at this video to get a feel for what we do at Impact People Coaching.

To book your space on one of our Personal Effectiveness Workshops call 07979805502 or email mattcollins@impactpeoplecoaching.com