Archive | October 2013

Give Feedback Like a Sports Coach #Leadership #Business

Give Feedback Like a Sports Coach

October 31, 2013

As a manager, you play different roles at different times – but the job of a manager, just like that of a coach or teacher, is to inspire people to be better. Most people respond better to encouragement than to criticism, so give praise when you can. According to Sir Alex Ferguson, one of the most successful coaches in sports history, nothing is better than hearing: “Well done.” He says, “Those are the two best words ever invented. You don’t need to use superlatives.” At the same time, giving clear criticism is important when your team members don’t meet expectations.

If you are too soft in your approach, you won’t be effective – but showing your anger all the time doesn’t work, either. There’s no point in harping on criticism; pick your moment, do it right away, and consider it done. Your timing and tone matter.

Adapted from “Ferguson’s Formula,” by Anita Elberse with Sir Alex Ferguson.

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Personal Effectiveness Workshops Held At The Vale Resort, South Wales

Future Dates For Our Personal Effectiveness Workshops Are:

  • Wed November 13th 2013
  • Wed December 4th 2013

To book your seat go to: http://personaleffectivenessworkshop.eventbrite.co.uk/ or call 0845 459 4541

Image

DEVELOPING YOUR PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS ONE-DAY WORKSHOP

 

Overview:

This unique one-day Personal Effectiveness Workshop focuses the importance of your personal impact, in relation to the results you achieve. To make a positive impact, you need to understand and manage yourself to consistently be the best you can possibly be (This is what Emotional Intelligence is all about).

What will I Learn?

We use our tried and tested “Circle of Impact” process that will teach you how to:

  • Manage your Mindset
  • Choose your Attitude
  • Utilise our Impact Strategies as Coping Mechanisms
  • Demonstrate the 8 Impact Behaviours

Who should attend?

This workshop is for anyone who wants to improve their overall effectiveness at work. The workshop will be particularly helpful to those taking on new roles and responsibilities; anyone from CEO to young rising star, who has the desire to be the best they can possibly be.

How will I benefit?

Not only will you learn how to consistently make the right impact to achieve success for yourself and your company, you will also design and commit to your own personalised Impact Commitment Plan, which will lay out precisely what you are planning to do and who you need to be in order to have your best year ever!

Workshop Facilitator:           

Jeff Collins, the founder of IPC, delivers the workshops personally. He uses his knowledge and insight gained from over 30 years of study and personal experience to present a unique and engaging workshop. Prior to setting up IPC in 2001, Jeff was a board director for 3 major global companies, Fisher-Price, Mattel and Hallmark Cards.  For the last 12 years he has worked as a Personal Effectiveness Coach to thousands of people at all levels, from CEO to young rising stars in major corporations such as Lloyds Banking Group, Universal Pictures, Sky News, Hasbro, Weight-Watchers and Disney, to name but a few.

To date, these workshops have only been available to the likes of the above corporations, on an exclusive and contracted basis. However, now you and your people can benefit by attending this highly successful workshop and reap the rewards that it will bring to your company.

Workshops will be run monthly and strictly limited to maximum of 16 candidates.

Image

Jeff Collins – Workshop Facilitator, MD of Impact People Coaching

 

Everyday leadership: Leading yourself can be life changing

October 31, 2013

The Marietta Times          

A lot of experiences culminate to result in one’s understanding of leadership and the leader’s vision of his or her future. Let me tell you one of my coal mine stories describing one such contributing story to my concept of leadership.

This day was similar to many others in the first three years of my nine-year mining career. Halfway through a double shift I volunteered for, I walked into the dinner hole with beads of sweat trailing down both cheeks. This working area with about four and one half feet of height was lower than most. I had torn my shirt on roof bolts twice that day. It would soon be time to buy another shirt to replace the tattered one. The new one wouldn’t last any longer, a couple of months at best. Five steps took me over to the wooden bench supported by concrete blocks. I reached for my round aluminum dinner bucket and set it on the bench as I lowered myself with a slight bounce. The lid of the bucket was fast due to the years of aluminum rubbing against aluminum. The four-inch deep insert in the bucket came out of the bottom attached to the lid. I looked into the bottom and watched my drinking water slosh around for a second. A small clump of white, powderish rockdust dislodged from the roof and landed in the water. Realizing my thirst, I raised it to my lips and drank deeply from the side of the bucket away from the cloud of rockdust. Then, I placed the insert between my knees and twisted off the lid.

Inside was a ham sandwich with mayonnaise on both slices of the bread in a baggy. Underneath the sandwich was a small Tupperware container filled with grapefruit pieces that sat beside two chocolate moon pies, one for me and one for my daughter, Betsy, when I returned home. She was always at the door waiting for her moon pie. I looked at the familiar meal, laid down the lid and placed my black. smudged face in my even blacker hands.

I decided to lie down and rest a minute before my half-hour lunch period was up. I reclined on the bench and turned my face toward the black wall of coal. Quickly, I slipped into a light sleep. As if in a dream, I heard a loud squeak echo in my ear. Startled, I opened my eyes and found myself staring less than three inches from the black beady eyes of a large rat whose front paws rested on the bench and hind legs remained on the mine floor. I rolled in the opposite direction and the rat escaped the dinner hole with equal speed.

I caught my breath and made an oath to myself that I would not spend the rest of my life working in a coal mine. I started taking classes at Ohio University’s Belmont County branch. It took six years to finish my bachelor and master’s degrees and finally get out of the mines. Leadership of one’s self may be the most important type of leadership. It is a plan that begins at one point and succeeds or is revised over time.

Written By R. Glenn Ray, Ph.D., the president of RayCom Learning.

The Benefits of a Positive Attitude – and Five Tactics for Doing It

By Matt Collins 12:21pm – October 30th 2013

There are quite a few things that you can do to improve your financial and personal state without spending even a single dime. One of the biggest is simply improving your attitude – the way you interpret the things around you and the way you relate to others.

Think about it for a moment. I want you to imagine the single most caustic person you’ve ever had to interact with for a long period of time (I certainly know who my person is). Did that person provide any sort of encouragement (outside of fear) to do any sort of constructive work? Did that person make you feel good and properly motivated to do exceptional work?

On the flip side of that coin, imagine the best person you’ve ever had to interact with in a professional way. Did you often go the extra mile when this person asked? Did you try harder in order to please this person? Did you simply enjoy your time in the workplace (or in everyday life) more because of this person?

What a world of difference the people around you make.

Of course, the same is true for you. To other people, you’re somewhere on that spectrum of positivity and negativity between the two people above. The more negative you are, the more others are going to react to you like you did to the negative person. The more positive you are, the more others are going to react to you like you did to the positive person.

To put it simply, the more positive you are, the greater the positive impact you have on your professional and personal life. Here are five areas where it comes through loud and clear.

Career success Positive people get promoted and get raises not just because of their own work, but because they bring out the best in others.

Stress reduction Negativity leads to stress because it convinces you that the events around you are bad. Meanwhile, looking for the positives in a situation convinces you that the events around you are better, which reduces stress. Lower stress has a strong effect on personal health and health care costs.

Teamwork improvement The more positive you are, the better your interactions will be with the people around you. Think simply of how you react in comparison to the people around you – the same general themes are true with regards to how people interact with you.

Customer relations improvement The same idea is true with your customers: the more positive you are with your customers, the better your relationship with them will be and the more business you’ll develop with them.

Motivational improvement This is perhaps the most unorthodox one, but it’s also true. If you look at your work with a positive attitude, it’s much easier to actually do the work than if you apply a negative attitude towards it, no matter what you’re doing.

That’s great, of course, but how exactly can you do that? Here are five specific tactics you can use in your day-to-day life to improve your attitude towards the people and things around you.

1. Come up with a positive response to every situation you meet. Yes, sometimes our first response is negative. I’m never happy when my daughter uses too much toilet paper and proceeds to flood the bathroom, for example. Simply stepping back for a moment and looking for a positive response to the situation, though, can make all the difference. The spilled water can be a close experience with my daughter, as I gather up some towels to mop up the water and allow her to help me as we sing songs while doing it, then I plunk her in the tub as I Lysol the floor, and then we have a fun bath time.

2. Look for the good in other people. Rather than seeking to identify the negative traits in the people around you that you interact with, look for the positive ones. Person A might not be the most skilled person, but he does put forth a lot of effort and ask a lot of good questions. Person B might have a caustic personality, but she does show tremendous efficiency in handling some incredibly complicated projects.

3. Act happy, even if it’s a painted dayglow smile. You don’t have to behappy – often, that’s an impossibly tall order. Instead, just act happy. The more you do it, the more natural it becomes. Even more interesting, the more you do it, the more it becomes a part of you – you actually do feel happier.

4. Drop the sarcasm. Sarcasm can be a lot of fun, but in the end, it’s just negativity wrapped up and packaged as a joke. Drop the sarcasm – you don’t need to ridicule things you don’t like. Just expend your energy elsewhere; don’t even think of the ridicule-worthy things at all.

5. Get plenty of rest and eat a good diet. This (along with exercise) is one sure way to naturally elevate your mood. It’ll increase your energy and focus, decrease your stress, and make it easier to interact with the world.

You have nothing to lose and everything to gain by adding a little more positivity to your life.

Personal Effectiveness Workshops Held At The Vale Resort, South Wales

Future Dates For Our Personal Effectiveness Workshops Are:

  • Wed November 13th 2013
  • Wed December 4th 2013

To book your seat go to: http://personaleffectivenessworkshop.eventbrite.co.uk/ or call 0845 459 4541

Image

DEVELOPING YOUR PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS ONE-DAY WORKSHOP

 

Overview:

This unique one-day Personal Effectiveness Workshop focuses the importance of your personal impact, in relation to the results you achieve. To make a positive impact, you need to understand and manage yourself to consistently be the best you can possibly be (This is what Emotional Intelligence is all about).

What will I Learn?

We use our tried and tested “Circle of Impact” process that will teach you how to:

  • Manage your Mindset
  • Choose your Attitude
  • Utilise our Impact Strategies as Coping Mechanisms
  • Demonstrate the 8 Impact Behaviours

Who should attend?

This workshop is for anyone who wants to improve their overall effectiveness at work. The workshop will be particularly helpful to those taking on new roles and responsibilities; anyone from CEO to young rising star, who has the desire to be the best they can possibly be.

How will I benefit?

Not only will you learn how to consistently make the right impact to achieve success for yourself and your company, you will also design and commit to your own personalised Impact Commitment Plan, which will lay out precisely what you are planning to do and who you need to be in order to have your best year ever!

Workshop Facilitator:           

Jeff Collins, the founder of IPC, delivers the workshops personally. He uses his knowledge and insight gained from over 30 years of study and personal experience to present a unique and engaging workshop. Prior to setting up IPC in 2001, Jeff was a board director for 3 major global companies, Fisher-Price, Mattel and Hallmark Cards.  For the last 12 years he has worked as a Personal Effectiveness Coach to thousands of people at all levels, from CEO to young rising stars in major corporations such as Lloyds Banking Group, Universal Pictures, Sky News, Hasbro, Weight-Watchers and Disney, to name but a few.

To date, these workshops have only been available to the likes of the above corporations, on an exclusive and contracted basis. However, now you and your people can benefit by attending this highly successful workshop and reap the rewards that it will bring to your company.

Workshops will be run monthly and strictly limited to maximum of 16 candidates.

Image

Jeff Collins – Workshop Facilitator, MD of Impact People Coaching

 
 

Get Off Your Butt: 16 Ways to Get Motivated When You’re in a Slump

Post written by Matt Collins. Follow us on Twitter @IPC_LTDImage

Even the most motivated of us — you, me, Tony Robbins — can feel unmotivated at times. In fact, sometimes we get into such a slump that even thinking about making positive changes seems too difficult.

But it’s not hopeless: with some small steps, baby ones in fact, you can get started down the road to positive change.

Yes, I know, it seems impossible at times. You don’t feel like doing anything. I’ve been there, and in fact I still feel that way from time to time. You’re not alone. But I’ve learned a few ways to break out of a slump, and we’ll take a look at those today.

This post was inspired by reader Roy C. Carlson, who asked:

“I was wondering if you could do a piece on why it can be hard for someone to change direction and start taking control of their life. I have to say I’m in this boat and advice on getting out of my slump would be great.”

Roy is just one of many with a slump like that. Again, I feel that way sometimes myself, and in fact sometimes I struggle to motivate myself to exercise — and I’ll use that as an example of how to break out of the slump.

When I fall out of exercise, due to illness or injury or disruption from things going on in my life, it’s hard to get started again. I don’t even feel like thinking about it, sometimes. But I’ve always found a way to break out of that slump, and here are some things I’ve learned that have helped:

  1. One Goal. Whenever I’ve been in a slump, I’ve discovered that it’s often because I have too much going on in my life. I’m trying to do too much. And it saps my energy and motivation. It’s probably the most common mistake that people make: they try to take on too much, try to accomplish too many goals at once. You cannot maintain energy and focus (the two most important things in accomplishing a goal) if you are trying to do two or more goals at once. It’s not possible — I’ve tried it many times. You have to choose one goal, for now, and focus on it completely. I know, that’s hard. Still, I speak from experience. You can always do your other goals when you’ve accomplished your One Goal.
  2. Find inspiration. Inspiration, for me, comes from others who have achieved what I want to achieve, or who are currently doing it. I read other blogs, books, magazines. I Google my goal, and read success stories. Zen Habits is just one place for inspiration, not only from me but from many readers who have achieved amazing things.
  3. Get excited. This sounds obvious, but most people don’t think about it much: if you want to break out of a slump, get yourself excited about a goal. But how can you do that when you don’t feel motivated? Well, it starts with inspiration from others (see above), but you have to take that excitement and build on it. For me, I’ve learned that by talking to my wife about it, and to others, and reading as much about it as possible, and visualizing what it would be like to be successful (seeing the benefits of the goal in my head), I get excited about a goal. Once I’ve done that, it’s just a matter of carrying that energy forward and keeping it going.
  4. Build anticipation. This will sound hard, and many people will skip this tip. But it really works. It helped me quit smoking after many failed attempts. If you find inspiration and want to do a goal, don’t start right away. Many of us will get excited and want to start today. That’s a mistake. Set a date in the future — a week or two, or even a month — and make that your Start Date. Mark it on the calendar. Get excited about that date. Make it the most important date in your life. In the meantime, start writing out a plan. And do some of the steps below. Because by delaying your start, you are building anticipation, and increasing your focus and energy for your goal.
  5. Post your goal. Print out your goal in big words. Make your goal just a few words long, like a mantra (“Exercise 15 mins. Daily”), and post it up on your wall or refrigerator. Post it at home and work. Put it on your computer desktop. You want to have big reminders about your goal, to keep your focus and keep your excitement going. A picture of your goal (like a model with sexy abs, for example) also helps.
  6. Commit publicly. None of us likes to look bad in front of others. We will go the extra mile to do something we’ve said publicly. For example, when I wanted to run my first marathon, I started writing a column about it in my local daily newspaper. The entire island of Guam (pop. 160K) knew about my goal. I couldn’t back down, and even though my motivation came and went, I stuck with it and completed it. Now, you don’t have to commit to your goal in your daily newspaper, but you can do it with friends and family and co-workers, and you can do it on your blog if you have one. And hold yourself accountable — don’t just commit once, but commit to giving progress updates to everyone every week or so.
  7. Think about it daily. If you think about your goal every day, it is much more likely to become true. To this end, posting the goal on your wall or computer desktop (as mentioned above) helps a lot. Sending yourself daily reminders also helps. And if you can commit to doing one small thing to further your goal (even just 5 minutes) every single day, your goal will almost certainly come true.
  8. Get support. It’s hard to accomplish something alone. When I decided to run my marathon, I had the help of friends and family, and I had a great running community on Guam who encouraged me at 5K races and did long runs with me. When I decided to quit smoking, I joined an online forum and that helped tremendously. And of course, my wife Eva helped every step of the way. I couldn’t have done these goals without her, or without the others who supported me. Find your support network, either in the real world or online, or both.
  9. Realize that there’s an ebb and flow. Motivation is not a constant thing that is always there for you. It comes and goes, and comes and goes again, like the tide. But realize that while it may go away, it doesn’t do so permanently. It will come back. Just stick it out and wait for that motivation to come back. In the meantime, read about your goal (see below), ask for help (see below), and do some of the other things listed here until your motivation comes back.
  10. Stick with it. Whatever you do, don’t give up. Even if you aren’t feeling any motivation today, or this week, don’t give up. Again, that motivation will come back. Think of your goal as a long journey, and your slump is just a little bump in the road. You can’t give up with every little bump. Stay with it for the long term, ride out the ebbs and surf on the flows, and you’ll get there.
  11. Start small. Really small. If you are having a hard time getting started, it may be because you’re thinking too big. If you want to exercise, for example, you may be thinking that you have to do these intense workouts 5 days a week. No — instead, do small, tiny, baby steps. Just do 2 minutes of exercise. I know, that sounds wimpy. But it works. Commit to 2 minutes of exercise for one week. You may want to do more, but just stick to 2 minutes. It’s so easy, you can’t fail. Do it at the same time, every day. Just some crunches, 2 pushups, and some jogging in place. Once you’ve done 2 minutes a day for a week, increase it to 5, and stick with that for a week. In a month, you’ll be doing 15-20. Want to wake up early? Don’t think about waking at 5 a.m. Instead, think about waking 10 minutes earlier for a week. That’s all. Once you’ve done that, wake 10 minutes earlier than that. Baby steps.
  12. Build on small successes. Again, if you start small for a week, you’re going to be successful. You can’t fail if you start with something ridiculously easy. Who can’t exercise for 2 minutes? (If that’s you, I apologize.) And you’ll feel successful, and good about yourself. Take that successful feeling and build on it, with another baby step. Add 2-3 minutes to your exercise routine, for example. With each step (and each step should last about a week), you will feel even more successful. Make each step really, really small, and you won’t fail. After a couple of months, your tiny steps will add up to a lot of progress and a lot of success.
  13. Read about it daily. When I lose motivation, I just read a book or blog about my goal. It inspires me and reinvigorates me. For some reason, reading helps motivate and focus you on whatever you’re reading about. So read about your goal every day, if you can, especially when you’re not feeling motivated.
  14. Call for help when your motivation ebbs. Having trouble? Ask for help. Email me. Join an online forum. Get a partner to join you. Call your mom. It doesn’t matter who, just tell them your problems, and talking about it will help. Ask them for advice. Ask them to help you overcome your slump. It works.
  15. Think about the benefits, not the difficulties. One common problem is that we think about how hard something is. Exercise sounds so hard! Just thinking about it makes you tired. But instead of thinking about how hard something is, think about what you will get out of it. For example, instead of thinking about how tiring exercise can be, focus on how good you’ll feel when you’re done, and how you’ll be healthier and slimmer over the long run. The benefits of something will help energize you.
  16. Squash negative thoughts; replace them with positive ones. Along those lines, it’s important to start monitoring your thoughts. Recognize negative self-talk, which is really what’s causing your slump. Just spend a few days becoming aware of every negative thought. Then, after a few days, try squashing those negative thoughts like a bug, and then replacing them with a corresponding positive thought. Squash, “This is too hard!” and replace it with, “I can do this! If that wimp Leo can do it, so can I!” It sounds corny, but it works. Really.
 
 

Reduce job stress by improving Emotional Intelligence

Learn to Recognize Hidden Stress

Even if you’re in a job where the environment has grown increasingly stressful, you can retain a large measure of self-control and self-confidence by understanding and practicing emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the ability to manage and use your emotions in positive and constructive ways. When it comes to satisfaction and success at work, emotional intelligence matters just as much as intellectual ability. Emotional intelligence is about communicating with others in ways that draw people to you, overcome differences, repair wounded feelings, and defuse tension and stress.

Emotional intelligence in the workplace:

Emotional intelligence in the workplace has four major components:

  • Self-awareness – The ability to recognize your emotions and their impact while using gut feelings to guide your decisions.
  • Self-management – The ability to control your emotions and behavior and adapt to changing circumstances.
  • Social awareness – The ability to sense, understand, and react to other’s emotions and feel comfortable socially.
  • Relationship management – The ability to inspire, influence, and connect to others and manage conflict.

The five key skills of emotional intelligence

There are five key skills that you need to master in order to raise your emotional intelligence and manage stress at work.

  • Realize when you’re stressed, recognize your particular stress response, and become familiar with sensual cues that can rapidly calm and energize you. The best way to reduce stress quickly is through the senses: through sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch. But each person responds differently to sensory input, so you need to find things that are soothing to you.
  • Stay connected to your internal emotional experience so you can appropriately manage your own emotions. Your moment-to-moment emotions influence your thoughts and actions, so pay attention to your feelings and factor them into your decision making at work. If you ignore your emotions you won’t be able to fully understand your own motivations and needs, or to communicate effectively with others.
  • Recognize and effectively use nonverbal cues and body language. In many cases, what we say is less important than how we say it or the other nonverbal signals we send out, such as eye contact, facial expression, tone of voice, posture, gesture and touch. Your nonverbal messages can either produce a sense of interest, trust, and desire for connection–or they can generate confusion, distrust, and stress. You also need to be able to accurately read and respond to the nonverbal cues that other people send you at work.
  • Develop the capacity to meet challenges with humor. There is no better stress buster than a hearty laugh and nothing reduces stress quicker in the workplace than mutually shared humor. But, if the laugh is at someone else’s expense, you may end up with more rather than less stress.
  • Resolve conflict positively. Resolving conflict in healthy, constructive ways can strengthen trust between people and relieve workplace stress and tension. When handling emotionally-charged situations, stay focused in the present by disregarding old hurts and resentments, connect with your emotions, and hear both the words and the nonverbal cues being used. If a conflict can’t be resolved, choose to end the argument, even if you still disagree.